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The Sound of Freedom

Marian Anderson, the Lincoln Memorial, and the Concert That Awakened America
Arsenault, Raymond (Book - 2009)
Average Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.
The Sound of Freedom
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This is the dramatic story behind Marian Anderson's concert at the Lincoln Memorial-an early milestone in civil rights history-on the seventieth anniversary of her performance. On Easter Sunday 1939, the brilliant vocalist Marian Anderson sang before a throng of seventy-five thousand at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington-an electrifying moment and an under appreciated milestone in civil rights history. Though she was at the peak of a dazzling career, Anderson had been barred from performing at the Daughters of the American Revolution's Constitution Hall because she was black. When Eleanor Roosevelt resigned from the DAR over the incident and took up Anderson's cause, however, it became a national issue. Like a female Jackie Robinson-but several years before his breakthrough-Anderson rose to a pressure-filled and politically charged occasion with dignity and courage, and struck a vital blow for civil rights. In the 1963 March on Washington, Martin Luther King would follow, literally, in Anderson's footsteps.--From publisher's description.
Authors: Arsenault, Raymond
Title: The sound of freedom
Marian Anderson, the Lincoln Memorial, and the concert that awakened America
Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury Press, 2009
Edition: 1st U.S. ed
Characteristics: 310 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm
Contents: Prologue: October 1964
1: Freedom's child
2: Singing in the dark
3: Deep rivers
4: Heart of a nation
5: Sweet land of liberty
Epilogue: American icon, 1943-93
Acknowledgments
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Summary: This is the dramatic story behind Marian Anderson's concert at the Lincoln Memorial-an early milestone in civil rights history-on the seventieth anniversary of her performance. On Easter Sunday 1939, the brilliant vocalist Marian Anderson sang before a throng of seventy-five thousand at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington-an electrifying moment and an under appreciated milestone in civil rights history. Though she was at the peak of a dazzling career, Anderson had been barred from performing at the Daughters of the American Revolution's Constitution Hall because she was black. When Eleanor Roosevelt resigned from the DAR over the incident and took up Anderson's cause, however, it became a national issue. Like a female Jackie Robinson-but several years before his breakthrough-Anderson rose to a pressure-filled and politically charged occasion with dignity and courage, and struck a vital blow for civil rights. In the 1963 March on Washington, Martin Luther King would follow, literally, in Anderson's footsteps.--From publisher's description.
ISBN: 1596915781
9781596915787
Branch Call Number: 323.1 Ar
Statement of Responsibility: Raymond Arsenault
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 271-297) and index
Subject Headings: United States Race relations History 20th century Lincoln Memorial (Washington, D.C.) African Americans Civil rights Civil rights movements Washington (D.C.) History 20th century Concerts Washington (D.C.) History 20th century Anderson, Marian, 1897-1993
Topical Term: Lincoln Memorial (Washington, D.C.)
African Americans
Civil rights movements
Concerts
LCCN: 2008053563
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app04 Version Arkelstorp Last updated 2014/10/23 09:41