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The Winter Sea

Kearsley, Susanna

(Book - 2010)
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
The Winter Sea
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Carrie settles into the shadow of Slains Castle in Scotland, creates a heroine named for one of her own ancestors, and starts to write about the Jacobite invasion of 1708. When she can no longer tell the difference between today and centuries ago, is she dealing with an ancestral memory-- a memory that might destroy her?
Publisher: Naperville, Ill. : Sourcebooks Landmark, 2010
ISBN: 1611291283
9781611291285
1402241372
9781402241376
Branch Call Number: FICTION Kea
Characteristics: 536 p. ; 21 cm

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Sep 15, 2014
  • amatrixlibrorum rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

As usual, Susanna Kearsley has woven history into a story which grabbed me and has still not let go although it has been several days since I finished. The way the author mirrored the events in Carrie's life with those of Sophia's was masterful. I laughed, I wept, I mourned, I rejoiced, and, in the end, I was completely satisfied with the way Ms. Kearsley wrapped up both stories. A satisfying and enjoyable book.

Mar 16, 2014
  • Beverleigh rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Great book. Once I started reading it I didn't want to put it down. Kept going back for "one more chapter".
Will definitely look for more books from this author.

Jun 26, 2013
  • annem123 rated this: 1.5 stars out of 5.

Let me start by saying I love Susanna Kearsley. And I had heard this book was spectacular. But I was disappointed. This is the story of Carrie, a historic fiction novelist who drawn to Cruden Bay in Scotland and through genetic memory begins to experience the life of her ancestor Sophia. The story alternates between Carrie and Sophia. What I disliked most was how this was more telling than showing. Historic facts were told by one character to another. It did not ring true as conversation. it became boring and long winded. Also, the plot was convoluted. And I figured out the ending of the story near the beginning.

Apr 10, 2013
  • bridge1 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Always enjoy her stories. She also writes thrillers as Emma Cole. Every Secret Thing is a good story.

Feb 01, 2013
  • elag24 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Susanna Kearsley has a very low key style of writing. Although there are many dramatic events, they don't just pop out! Nevertheless, once I started reading this, I couldn't put the book down. I look forward to other Kearsley works.

Oct 30, 2012
  • jmlaudem rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This is the first book I have read from this author. I loved this book and had trouble putting it down! Her writing style is similar to Kate Morton so check her books out if you liked this one. Can't wait to read another by Kearsley.

Aug 31, 2012
  • jdatwell rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Good in parts but again it seemed like the author had an idea but just didn't keep the flow right the flipping got a little old one chapter in the past the next in the next in the present was just to much the flow was hard to in parts to keep into. should have kept the past more together or something i just had a hard time getting into it.

May 15, 2012
  • greenacres rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Kearsley has never disappointed me. Mariana and The Winter Sea are my favourites of this author.

Nov 05, 2011
  • Elizabeth49 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I didn't want to finish this book. While reading it, I could visualize the setting and the characters perfectly. I got involved with the characters and the emotions they felt - both in the present and in the past. It was, for me, a beautiful book.

Oct 18, 2011
  • SuzeParker rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Historically rich, The Winter Sea is a clever weaving together of a contemporary story -- writer Carie McClelland's historical research into her latest book project and her blossoming romance with her landlord's son -- with the account of her book's subjects during the planning and aftermath of the 1708 failed Scottish Jacobite uprising. After spending five months in France, where she has researched the court of the pretender king and intends to locate her novel's events, Carrie is frustrated that work on the book is progressing slowly. She takes a break by visiting her friend and agent near Cruden Bay in Scotland, where she is drawn to a ruined castle that figured significantly into the Jacobite plot, and where she finds that the historical story begins to tell itself through her dreams. She first writes and then researches the characters and plot lines that emerge, finding that her research confirms the accuracy of places, names and events. Near the end, because Carrie's research reveals that her book's hero died in battle, she deals wisely with her struggle between writing a historically accurate novel and delivering a happy ending to her waiting readers. The Winter Sea contains politics, historical intrigue and military strategy, seemingly upstanding characters whose trustworthiness is questionable and romance that is both heart-warming and gut-wrenching. Told through the eyes of Carrie's young heroine, Sophia, and, in the contemporary part of the tale through Carrie herself, The Winter Sea is engrossing.

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Oct 19, 2014
  • andreareads rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Jimmy Keith rose from his chair with that chivalric reflex that some men of his generation hadn’t lost, and most men of my own had never learnt.

Oct 19, 2014
  • andreareads rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

It was a running joke between us that whenever we discovered a male ancestor, his name was either John or James, or, very rarely, David – common names that make it difficult to trace them in the records. There might be countless James McClellands listed living in a town, and we would have to check details of every one of them before we found the one that we were after. ‘What we need,’ my father always used to say, ‘is an Octavius, or maybe a Horatio.’

Oct 19, 2014
  • andreareads rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Most of history is only the tale of the winning side, anyway, and they’ve a motive for painting the other side black. No, the Stewarts weren’t that bad. Take James, for example – old James, who was father to your King James. Most of the books that say he was a bad king and cruel and the rest of it, all that came down from one single account that was written by someone just passing on rumours years after the fact. If you read what was actually written by those who were with James, who saw what he did, they have nothing but good things to say of the man. But historians went with the rumours, and once it’s been written in print, well, it’s taken as gospel, and then it’s a source for the research of future historians, so we keep copying lies and mistakes . . . That’s why I tell my students to always get back to original documents. Don’t trust the books.

Oct 19, 2014
  • andreareads rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

he’d dismissed it as an unimportant detail since it wasn’t about him

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Oct 18, 2011
  • SuzeParker rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Historically rich, The Winter Sea is a clever weaving together of a contemporary story -- writer Carie McClelland's historical research into her latest book project and her blossoming romance with her landlord's son -- with the account of her book's subjects during the planning and aftermath of the 1708 failed Scottish Jacobite uprising. After spending five months in France, where she has researched the court of the pretender king and intends to locate her novel's events, Carrie is frustrated that work on the book is progressing slowly. She takes a break by visiting her friend and agent near Cruden Bay in Scotland, where she is drawn to a ruined castle that figured significantly into the Jacobite plot, and where she finds that the historical story begins to tell itself through her dreams. She first writes and then researches the characters and plot lines that emerge, finding that her research confirms the accuracy of places, names and events. Near the end, because Carrie's research reveals that her book's hero died in battle, she deals wisely with her struggle between writing a historically accurate novel and delivering a happy ending to her waiting readers. The Winter Sea contains politics, historical intrigue and military strategy, seemingly upstanding characters whose trustworthiness is questionable and romance that is both heart-warming and gut-wrenching. Told through the eyes of Carrie's young heroine, Sophia, and, in the contemporary part of the tale through Carrie herself, The Winter Sea is engrossing.

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