Nosferatu

Nosferatu

Symphony of Horror

DVD - 2013
Average Rating:
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The quintessential silent vampire film, crafted by legendary German director F. W. Murnau. Rather than depicting Dracula as a shape-shifting monster or debonair gentleman, Murnau's Graf Orlok is a nightmarish, spidery creature of bulbous head and taloned claws, perhaps the most genuinely disturbing incarnation of vampirism yet envisioned.
Publisher: New York, New York : Kino Classics, 2013
Edition: 2-disc deluxe remastered edition
Branch Call Number: 7.914 No
Characteristics: video file,DVD video,region 1
NTSC
digital,optical,Dolby digital
2 videodiscs (95 min.) : sound, black and white, color tinted ; 4 3/4 in
Alternative Title: FW Murnau's Nosferatu

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t
trcookIIImddmd
Jun 11, 2017

Historical and artistic value? This is crap.

Franln May 19, 2017

This must have been a very scary movie in 1922... not so much now. I do appreciate it's historical and artistic value but I just kept falling asleep. The bonus feature was more interesting to me than the movie itself.

j
jazeebelle
Jan 23, 2015

What can be said about this iconic and terrifying film. the silent effect only makes it creepier. This vampire is truely a monster. LOVE IT!!!

i
Isley
Jun 17, 2014

One of the all time great silent films, masterfully shot and constructed. Schreck as the vampire elevates the role to something that is both beyond human and beyond evil, and infuses the movie with an overwhelming sense of dread.

m
ManMachine
Apr 27, 2014

Meet the grand-daddy of all vampires in the grand-daddy of all vampire movies. ~~~ In the 92 years since Max Schreck played Count Orlok (Dracula) in Nosferatu, no other actor has yet even come close to matching the blood-chilling hideousness of his portrayal. ~~~ With his skeletal frame, rodent face, long nails & pointed ears, Schreck excels, beyond compare, as being the most truly repulsive & terrifying of all screen vampires. ~~~ Nosferatu is an exceptional product of the German Expressionistic era in flim-making and is a real milestone in the history of cinematic horror. ~~~ This early, silent-version of Dracula is, at times, brilliantly eerie, and full of imaginative touches that none of the later vampire films ever managed to recapture. ~~~ Yes. Nosferatu is flawed and its pace is not at all like films of today. But it still does manage to hold up quite well, considering that it's nearly 100 years old.

m
Monolith
Mar 02, 2013

Max Schreck as the gaunt, wide-eyed Count Orlok is, to me, without question the creepiest specter in classic horror. The age of the piece only magnifies the spookiness. Some funny bits, too -- e.g. the nutjob "Knock". This version has two choices for the score; I preferred Timothy Howard's pipe organ option. I first tried The Silent Orchestra's score, but I found its modern experimental sounds didn't deliver the appropriate vintage feeling to a ninety year old film.

AnneDromeda Oct 29, 2010

Looking for a Halloween scare that will chill you to the bone without the squirm-worthy slasher-film blood-and-guts? You could do a lot worse than downloading the 1922 German film _Nosferatu_. Directed by FW Mernau, this first-ever vampire movie was based on Bram Stoker’s _Dracula_. This version features a musical score running throughout and English subtitles to the German script presented throughout the film. Yeah, you read that right: This film is so old it was released in the silent film era. Don’t let that deter you, though – many film buffs and several laypeople who simply love horror films consider this to be the definitive film interpretation of Stoker’s tale. With his sunken eyes, clawed fingernails, and vaguely rodentine features, Max Schrek’s performance as Count Orlock provides cinema with its most terrifying, least sexy vampire to date (the iconic shots of him rising full-length from the coffin and his silhouette creeping up the staircase are the only cinematic images to ever give me nightmares). In fact, the performance was so unbelievably creepy that the popular imagination at the time wanted to believe he, too, was undead. This idea was explored further in the film _Shadow of the Vampire_ featuring Willem Dafoe, John Malkovitch and others, and the two movies together make a great Halloween double feature.

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m
Monolith
Mar 02, 2013

Count Graf Orlok: "You've hurt yourself... The precious blood!"

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