A Moveable Feast

A Moveable Feast

Book - 1996
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Begun in the autumn of 1957 and published posthumously in 1964, Ernest Hemingway's A Moveable Feast captures what it meant to be young and poor and writing in Paris during the 1920s.

"You belong to me and all Paris belongs to me and I belong to this notebook and this pencil."

A correspondent for the Toronto Star, Hemingway arrived in Paris in 1921, three years after the trauma of the Great War and at the beginning of the transformation of Europe's cultural landscape: Braque and Picasso were experimenting with cubist forms; James Joyce, long living in self-imposed exile from his native Dublin, had just completed Ulysses; Gertude Stein held court at 27 rue de Fleurus, and deemed young Ernest a member of rue g#65533;n#65533;ration perdue; and T. S. Eliot was a bank clerk in London. It was during these years that the as-of-yet unpublished young writer gathered the material for his first novel, The Sun Also Rises, and the subsequent masterpieces that followed.

Among these small, reflective sketches are unforgettable encounters with the members of Hemingway's slightly rag-tag circle of artists and writers, some also fated to achieve fame and glory, others to fall into obscurity. Here, too, is an evocation of the Paris that Hemingway knew as a young man -- a map drawn in his distinct prose of the streets and caf#65533;s and bookshops that comprised the city in which he, as a young writer, sometimes struggling against the cold and hunger of near poverty, honed the skills of his craft.

A Moveable Feast is at once an elegy to the remarkable group of expatriates that gathered in Paris during the twenties and a testament to the risks and rewards of the writerly life.
Publisher: New York : Scribner Classics, 1996
Edition: First Scribner Classics edition
ISBN: 9780684833637
0684833638
Branch Call Number: 921 Hemin
Characteristics: 207 pages, 9 pages of plates : illustrations ; 22 cm

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a
atfrancis
Jul 29, 2016

A delicious book! If you have been to Paris you will yearn to return. If you haven't been, you will be booking a trip.

m
msemos
Nov 25, 2015

a self absorbed young man always ready to talk about "friends". still the setting of paris after wwI was fascinating as were some of the less personal stories about the other inhabitants of the literary world in paris

m
magmot
Aug 27, 2014

This is an informative reading, and it comes best after reading "A Paris Wife" - so happy it just happened I've read that one first.

n
nannyanne
Jul 07, 2013

Read this book after The Paris Wife, more out of an interest in Hadley, Hemmingway's wife, than the author himself. I don't appreciate Hemmingway's fiction and short stories, but found this to be an interesting account of his time as a young writer, husband, and father in Paris.

s
sharon711
May 04, 2013

Hemmingway came across as a naive man to me, focused mainly on himself. Some of the descriptions of Paris are evocative. But I found "A Paris Wife", in Hatley's voice, to be much more interesting.

m
mmorales1022
Aug 26, 2012

I read this book after i read The Paris Wife. Both books are accounts for The Hemingway's years in Paris. I really enjoyed The Paris Wife which then encouraged me to read The Moveable Feast to compare and contrast.
Love the first-person accounts.

ser_library Oct 16, 2011

a wonderful complement to the movie "Midnight in Paris"

the picture of how Hem wrote is enlightening

s
superglu
Jul 22, 2011

You can get some further details under the "Review" tab. This version includes a bunch of sections that Hemingway decided to leave out of the original book as well as a number of alternative versions of sections that were included. Interesting in an academic way, but I didn't find it added to my appreciation of the book.

While many people find this book to be largely gossip (and a lot of nasty gossip) about people who have been dead for a long time, it was a personal touchstone for me as a teenager, and I still love it (in either version).

h
Heyst
Jul 20, 2011

Hem sharing the anecdote about Fitzgerald's private parts is just so over the top competitive, pathetic,infantile. The Great Gatsy is better than anything he ever wrote so I guess he had to get even. Tavernier-Courbin's book is a good antidote. She doesn't pull any punches.

a
AJ_in_CoMo
Mar 21, 2011

Enjoyed this book and the first-person accounts regarding other famous people of the time, such as Ezra Pound, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein. Favorite quote: "He liked the works of his friends, which is beautiful as loyalty but can be disastrous as judgment."

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RegeniaS Jul 21, 2014

RegeniaS thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

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Reader1015 Mar 12, 2012

Not one of Hemingway's best works but the stories dovetail nicely with The Paris Wife. The Paris Wife is a lovely book about Hemingway's tumultuous relationship with his first wife Hadley. These stories re-iterate and expand the details and Ernest's thoughts during that time of his life.

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nannyanne
Jul 07, 2013

"There is never any ending to Paris and the memory of each person who has lived in it differs from that of any other. We always returned to it no matter who we were or how it was changed or with what difficulties, or ease, it could be reached. Paris was always worth it and you received return for whatever you brought to it. But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy."

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