Persepolis

Persepolis

Book - 2003
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Originally published to wide critical acclaim in France, where it elicited comparisons to Art Spiegelman's Maus , Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi's wise, funny, and heartbreaking memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran's last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country.

Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran: of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life and of the enormous toll repressive regimes exact on the individual spirit. Marjane's child's-eye-view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a stunning reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, through laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.
Publisher: New York : Pantheon Books, [2003], ©2003
Edition: First America edition
ISBN: 9780375422300
0375422307
Branch Call Number: 921 Satra
Characteristics: 153 pages : chiefly illustrations ; 24 cm

Opinion

From Library Staff

In black-and-white comic strip images, the author tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages 6 to 14, during the Islamic Revolution.

In this graphic novel, Satrapi shares her memories of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution.

A graphic novel memoir about growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution.

Marjane grows up during the tumult of the Iranian Revolution.


From the critics


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m
modestgoddess
Jan 05, 2017

My husband grew up in Tehran - before the revolution. His parents sent him to university in Canada and he never went back. I was curious to read this to learn more about Iran - and it was a compelling and frightening glimpse into a world, once civilized, gone crazy. Really shows the impact of the revolution on normal/ordinary people, and how insane a corrupt power can be. The drawings are wonderful and the tale, though horrific in places and hard to take in, is presented in a palatable way.... "Palatable" is not really the word I'm looking for but I can't think how else to phrase it. Hard to read, but possible to read - perhaps that's what I mean. A coming-of-age story set in a time and place where the government, such as it was, became more infantile and controlling - growing up in a country that is dumbing down.

m
maroon_chicken
Aug 08, 2016

The story told in this book was amazing and captivating, but the art felt flat, and at times somewhat dull. On the other hand, it did not draw too much attention to itself, and I loved the writing.

ohbois Jun 25, 2016

This was absolutely wonderful to read! For a Persian, as of myself, I found this beautiful because almost all my family lived through that time and it was amazing to maybe think about what they were going through. She is a wonderful author and her outspoken personality makes it fun to read! I wish I could give this book 6/5 stars because it deserves every single one of them. Such an empowering and thought changing book! Loved it

c
csrestall
Jun 23, 2016

I really enjoyed this interesting perspective of the war in Iran and the surrounding time period. I have never been very knowledgeable in this area and it gives great insight into the issues of the time. I am really excited to continue this journey and read part two! Very enjoyable recommended to people who are looking for information on the war in Iran, those who enjoy graphic novels, or women's issues.

CMLibrary_sdeason Mar 01, 2016

Convincingly written from a young girl's perspective in war-torn Iran. As a graphic novel, it leaves a lot to the imagination of the reader, but still seems to require thought.

q
Qwfwq
Nov 05, 2015

Very moving, We sometimes forget that history is not just a series of events, but people like you and me having to live through these events. The horror is there, but there is also a great deal of humour and irony. Satrapi does a great job of breaking everything down to the human level, giving the reader a vivid and authentic feeling of what it was like to be the kid who had to live through that nasty bit of history.

SchroederTribe Aug 23, 2015

Perspectives. An interesting and arresting way to read a coming of age memoir set in Iran

s
susanchyn
Aug 14, 2015

This book should be on the required reading list for anyone wanting a quick lesson on the history of Iran.

The art has clean lines; the balloons are unexpected and make you laugh out loud.

The narrator is smart and brave, like TKAM's Scout. But she dreams large, wanting to become a Prophet when she grows up...

The presiding regimes change like the weather, and Marjane misses nothing.

d
DaisyCosh
Aug 10, 2015

"Persepolis" was the first graphic novel I ever read. It set the bar pretty high. "Persepolis" is the memoir of author Marjane Satrapi. It tells a tale spanning eight years of her youth within the historical context of her country. Marjane lived in Tehran, Iran, and so, much of her story sheds light on Iranian culture and family life while living under an oppressive religious regime. "Persepolis" doesn't shy away from depictions of the violence during the Islamic Revolution, especially the disturbing scenes of torture that interrogators used. It shakes Marjane's innocent mind and forces her to acknowledge things beyond her age bracket. Meanwhile, there are universal themes as well. For example, Marjane's dictated to about what she can and can't be. Even the school administration forces her to fit in the right box. Anybody from any culture has experienced pressures of conformity. These human moments in "Persepolis" are some of my favourites, drawing in the audience by holding up a mirror to the reader. I also enjoyed the stark black-and-white artwork which, to her credit, Marjane Satrapi illustrated herself. However, at some points, "Persepolis" felt like it was all occurring too quickly because the passing of time isn't conveyed very well. If I had to point out its weakness, I think the book's transitions were too foggy. It's still a great read, though. Considering its subject matter, I would recommend this book for a mature teen or young adult. Anyone interested in Middle Eastern history or comic-style art would probably love it as much as I did. I look forward to reading the sequel, "Persepolis 2", in the future.

WVMLStaffPicks Dec 31, 2014

This is a riveting account of a young girl growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. Powerful black-and-white comic strip images paint a picture of daily life in a time of chilling, absurd and terrifying events. Her child’s eye view is disarming, tender and rebellious. The author does not want her entire nation to be judged by the wrongdoings of a few extremists and she succeeds in letting us see the political depths and individuality of its citizens. Try this for a great introduction to the “graphic novel” genre.

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c
csrestall
Jun 23, 2016

csrestall thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

m
mauve_dogfish_10
Nov 15, 2015

mauve_dogfish_10 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

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red_rat_135
Mar 26, 2015

red_rat_135 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

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shreya_narla
Jul 21, 2014

shreya_narla thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

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imaginethat
Feb 10, 2011

imaginethat thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Notices

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c
csrestall
Jun 23, 2016

Frightening or Intense Scenes: Depicts war time/death

c
csrestall
Jun 23, 2016

Coarse Language: minor swears

i
imaginethat
Feb 10, 2011

Violence: This title contains Violence.

i
imaginethat
Feb 10, 2011

Coarse Language: This title contains Coarse Language.

i
imaginethat
Feb 10, 2011

Sexual Content: This title contains Sexual Content.

Summary

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c
csrestall
Jun 23, 2016

This is a graphic novel from the perspective of a young girl living in Iran during the time of the Iranian War, and the changing of regimes during that time. the change from modernity to Islamic law. This novel deals with the issues that this girl faces and her subsequent departure to Austria.

deelitch Dec 14, 2014

Iran.. in graphic comic book style, from the viewpoint of a young girl growing up in Tehran. Brilliant.

Ninja_Kevin Jun 03, 2012

I have recently finished a book called, "Persepolis" by Satrapi Marjane, a memoir. In this book the protagonist is Marji, she is a young girl who lives with her parents. Her parents would go into the streets at night and protest with others that have the same race as her because they didn’t like how they were treated and etc. The setting which it mostly took place is in Iran. Marji has to whear this veil in school, so they started a cultural revolution in Iran so that is when her parents started to protest in the streets.

EPLPicks_Teen Mar 30, 2010

Memoir told in comic-strip format of Marjane's girlhood in Iran during and after the Islamic Revolution.

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