The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time

Haddon, Mark

Book - 2003
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time
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Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions. He cannot stand to be touched. Although gifted with a superbly logical brain, Christopher is autistic. Everyday interactions and admonishments have little meaning for him. Routine, order and predictability shelter him from the messy, wider world. Then, at fifteen, Christopher's carefully constructed world falls apart when he finds his neighbor's dog, Wellington, impaled on a garden fork, and he is initially blamed for the killing. Christopher decides that he will track down the real killer and turns to his favorite fictional character, the impeccably logical Sherlock Holmes, for inspiration. But the investigation leads him down some unexpected paths and ultimately brings him face to face with the dissolution of his parents' marriage. As he tries to deal with the crisis within his own family, we are drawn into the workings of Christopher's mind. And herein lies the key to the brilliance of Mark Haddon's choice of narrator: The most wrenching of emotional moments are chronicled by a boy who cannot fathom emotion. The effect is dazzling, making for a novel that is deeply funny, poignant, and fascinating in its portrayal of a person whose curse and blessing is a mind that perceives the world literally . The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Tim e is one of the freshest debuts in years: a comedy, a heartbreaker, a mystery story, a novel of exceptional literary merit that is great fun to read.

Publisher: New York :, Doubleday,, 2003
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 0385512104
0385509456
Branch Call Number: FICTION Had
Characteristics: 226 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm

Opinion

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Christopher, an autistic teen who takes everything literally, is accused of killing his neighbor's dog. He vows to find the real killer, despite the objections of his father and his neighbors.


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Feb 05, 2015
  • GavinsB rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

This book was not what I expected - it was a lot more complex. Having said that, the way it was written was very simple, due to the nature of the main character. I found the diagrams uninteresting, as I am not mathematically minded.

Jan 05, 2015
  • WVMLStaffPicks rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Christopher, a mathematically gifted fifteen-year-old autistic boy, decides to write an account of his investigation into the murder of his neighbour’s dog for his own satisfaction and to present to his teacher. In the process, he has to conquer his fear of interacting with strangers and even undertakes a terrifying rail trip to London as he acts on information he discovers about his mother. This vision of the world presented through the eyes of an autistic boy evokes many emotions; it is entertaining and an aid to understanding others.

Dec 26, 2014
  • epink91 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

That was a wonderful book I ever read. There were so many connections that pertained to me. Between the main character and myself, we love math.

Dec 02, 2014
  • britprincess1 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A unique book from the perspective of an autistic boy, THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME was originally meant as a children's book, but it became a book beloved by all ages. It tells the story of Christopher, an intelligent boy who sees the world through a different scope. With reality edited through his eyes, the narrative becomes a fascinating discovery of the matters of Christopher's home life. Considering the unique style and unfolding of events, I definitely recommend this novel.

Aug 07, 2014
  • danielestes rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

One would think that a first-person fictional narrative about a teenage boy who likely has Asperger syndrome (the story doesn't explicitly say) would come across as repetitive and tedious. After all, the mannerisms of someone with this disorder are often, uh, repetitive and tedious. I can't imagine a sensible author choosing to write a book in this style. Except in this case, I could listen all day long. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon has a language that sings like poetry.

The dog in question, the one from the title and also depicted on most of the book covers, is solely a starting point for our Christopher John Francis Boone to tepidly venture out in the world. His daily life, his ability to cope, is built on familiar routines, and... well, let's just say things are about to get a whole lot less routine for him.

Jun 12, 2014

WOw, this is one of the best books I have ever read.

Apr 21, 2014
  • jasontrent rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Haddon has gone out of his way to say that Christopher is not autisitc and that he simply has a made-up disorder that is very much like autism.
This gives him lisence to have Christopher function the way he needs the character to function in the story and to allow us to relate to and empathize with the character.
I enjoyed the book up until the train-ride and things drag a bit. And the resoloution is no great shakes, but it's a quick and harmless read. Can't help but think this book was an influence on the autisitcly portrayed BBC Sherlock Holmes...

Mar 25, 2014

With depiction of autism in this book - compare with London Eye Mystery and even description of Sherlock Holmes. There is definitely an element of autism spectrum in a lot of mysteries.

Jan 10, 2014
  • fandesoleil rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Great job with a limited point-of-view narrator. Inventive and feels true to life, from my experience with an autistic boy. The pace dragged midway, but it picked up in the last third. Worth a read.

Jan 07, 2014
  • molmil8 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

I read this book after seeing so many people reading it on the bus many years ago. I really enjoyed it because it was so different than what I usually read. Very entertaining and also helps to give those with no personal experience with autism a little perspective. I would also recommend the film TEMPLE GRANDIN (also available at OPL), it is an inspiring true story.

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Feb 12, 2015
  • GavinsB rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

GavinsB thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

Jun 12, 2014

ArvinMadhi thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

Aug 23, 2013
  • taupe_ape_23 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

taupe_ape_23 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

Aug 14, 2013
  • anythingfantasygoes rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

anythingfantasygoes thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

Jul 07, 2013
  • violet_panda_860 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

violet_panda_860 thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

Jun 18, 2013
  • pratima1 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

pratima1 thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

Aug 03, 2012
  • nazpakkal rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

nazpakkal thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Aug 08, 2011
  • Fantasylover97 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Fantasylover97 thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

May 29, 2011
  • rorymack rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

rorymack thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Feb 10, 2011
  • imaginethat rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

imaginethat thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

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Summary

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Aug 31, 2013
  • blue_butterfly_2610 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Christopher John Francis Boone is a strange boy. One who does not like being yelled at or even touch. He knows all the countries in the world and every prime number up to 7,057. He detests the color yellow and brown. In this book Christopher not only solves the mystery of the killing of Wellington he writes a book about it. At the end he finds himself finding his so called dead mother.

Jul 11, 2013
  • LibraryUser53 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

In first person narative form, 15 year old Asperger afflicted Christopher describes his "detecting" methods in the "Case of the Murdered French Poodle". Christopher finds the neighbor's dog killed with a garden fork. And with this start, Christopher -- who has never ventured further than the local store down the street before -- procedes from the British countryside to London. There, the story reaches its emotionally touching -- yet disturbing -- conclusion. While not possessing the normal social skills of someone his age, which causes many relationship problems with friends and family, Christopher still is an expert in science and mathematics. Geometry, relativity, and advanced topics in prime number theory all come into play during
Christopher's "dectecting". The essence of the story: Will Christopher be able to mentally detach the chaos surrounding his personal life with his "detecting" in the "Case of the Murdered French Poodle"?

Apr 26, 2011
  • SaanichLori rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

A 15 year old autistic boy finds his neighbour's poodle dead with a garden fork through its body. At first he is accused of the murder, but after he is cleared, he decides to find out who the killer is.

Interesting note: the chapters are not sequential number, but rather prime numbers.

Notices

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Aug 14, 2013
  • anythingfantasygoes rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: This book has quite an amount of curse words in it, which is to be expected, sine it is in the young adult section.

Aug 08, 2011
  • Fantasylover97 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: this book has some coarse languages throughout the story

Feb 10, 2011
  • imaginethat rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: This title contains Sexual Content.

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