Meet John Doe

Meet John Doe

DVD - 2004
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Reporter Ann Mitchell concocts a story about a fictional character named John Doe and makes him the subject of a column telling his intention to commit suicide over the sorry state of mankind. As the story spreads a grassroots movemnet develops, showering compassion on the fictional "John Doe", thereby saving the character.

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a
akirakato
Apr 25, 2017

This is a 1941 American dramedy directed and produced by Frank Capra, based on a story by Richard Connell and Robert Presnell.
The film shows a "grassroots" political campaign created unwittingly by a newspaper columnist (Barbara Stanwyck) with the involvement of a hired homeless man (Gary Cooper) and pursued by the paper's wealthy owner.
Although the theme seems clearly understood, Barbara Stanwyck appears overacting.
She doesn't easily fit into this kind of situation.
She could look better in a more serious drama.

t
TtamioO
Dec 27, 2016

Election Year 2016 again.

m
Monolith
Oct 12, 2015

Another gem from the maestro, Frank Capra. I loved it (even though this copy the B.P.L. purchased is a cheap bootleg knockoff with terrible visuals and audio). Cooper and Stanwyck were outstanding.

n
Nursebob
Dec 13, 2014

Desperate to save her job, a newspaper columnist fabricates a suicide letter from the anonymous “John Doe”, an unemployed everyman so disillusioned by slimy politicians and the “state of civilization” that he plans to stage the ultimate protest by leaping from the roof of City Hall on Christmas Eve. Her cheeky stunt backfires however when first the town, and then the entire nation takes up the fictitious man’s cause forcing her and her publisher to hire a penniless drifter to fill his pretend shoes. Yet another quasi-socialist fairytale from Frank Capra in which Evil Capitalists square off against the Common Man and we’re all assured that Utopia is just around the corner if only we’d just be extra nice to one another. A surprisingly dour climax in front of a stadium full of Doe supporters is quickly brushed aside in favour of church bells, teary embraces, and one overly long, cliché-riddled sermon atop a snowy roof. A sweet film, but it’s message of naïve optimism does not sit well with the pragmatic cynicism of the new millennium.

v
voisjoe1_0
Nov 03, 2014

From 1931 to 1946, director Frank Capra produced one masterpiece after another. This 1941 film stars one of Capra’s favorite actors Gary Cooper in his prime. Cooper gets to play John Willoughby who pretends to be a common American man named John Doe. Cooper shows what a great actor is as he tries out different possible John Does. For a short minute, this film is a patriotic film that shows the greatness of American democracy who needs the unity of the common men, not a strong man like Hitler, Mussolini, Franco, or Stalin. But then the film gets sinister as the common men of the John Doe Clubs get taken over by a strong man who wants to use it to become American president. Sound a little like2012? Where the billionaires form and control a group of common men so they can use it to get one of their millionaire surrogates to be elected president? By the way, did you notice a few nearly-invisible African-Americans. During this filming era, Hollywood bigwigs were either totally racist or they just didn't want to reduce the attendance of whites who might be offended by Black people in white people movies.

g
garycornell
Jun 22, 2014

One of Frank Capra's best films for is Meet John Doe. Capra detested the corruption in government, in business, and especially the media. So he takes them on in Meet John Doe. John Doe turns out to be Gary Cooper who turns his back on fame and glory. A Frank Capra Five Star Movie and a couple added stars for Gary Coopers performance.

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