Killers of the Flower Moon

Killers of the Flower Moon

The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

Book - 2017
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In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood.
Publisher: New York : Doubleday, 2017
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780385534246
0385534248
Branch Call Number: 364.152 Gr
Description: x, 338 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm

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From Library Staff

In the 1920s the Osage negotiated to maintain the mineral rights for their corner of Oklahoma. Soon oil rigs were everywhere, making the Osage very rich. And that’s when they started dying. Selection for June 7, 2018.

Once oil was found on the Osage Nation's territory in the late 19th century, the Osage became "the wealthiest people per capita in the world," a distinction that attracted cunning and greed along with the riches. Grann shares the grisly details of the cold-blooded, systematic killing of... Read More »

In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation who discovered oil underneath their land in Oklahoma. But, when the Osage began to get killed off one by one in cold blood, the FBI took up the case, marking it as one of their first major homicide in... Read More »

This book shares the true story of the Osage Native Americans, whose massive murders over oil rights were investigated by the newly established FBI.

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CRRL_Adriana Jun 07, 2017

Once oil was found on the Osage Indian Nation's territory in the late 19th century, the Osage became "the wealthiest people per capita in the world," a distinction that attracted cunning and greed along with the riches. Grann shares the grisly details of the cold-blooded, systematic kil... Read More »


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mitchelclay
Jun 19, 2018

As the choice for "One Read" by Daniel Boone Regional Library in Columbia, MO, I knew that I had to get my hands on this book. It had actually been on my list since it came out. A good portion of my heritage is Sioux, so when I heard of the "reign of terror" in the Osage territory, my interest was peaked. What I found was a heartbreaking story of murder, theft, and loss. If you have any interest in true crime or Native American history, you owe it to yourself to read this book.

DBRL_KrisA Jun 09, 2018

This is the One Read selection here in Columbia MO for 2018. There will be a lot of discussion of the book in the next few months, a lot of reviews by others, so I'll just say a few things.

The first two-thirds of the book, covering the events themselves and the investigation of the killings, are pretty straightforward. The final section, covering events after people were found guilty of *some* of the murders, is a bit harder to follow. It jumps from case to case, from person to person, filling in some holes and uncovering other things that weren't discovered by the investigators. Since the book really is less about Mollie Burkhardt and the victims themselves, and more about the investigation of the murders, this section dwells more on the "where are they now" of Agent White and Hoover than on Mollie's life after the trials. The very last part of the book is interesting in that it reveals that the murders (to say nothing of the fleecing of the Osage) were probably a lot more widespread than everyone thought at the time.

t
ThisAperture
May 11, 2018

This is an important chapter in American history that hasn't received nearly enough attention. For those interested in better understanding this country's history of white supremacy, this is a gripping -- and frustrating -- tale of injustice and exploitation perpetrated against the Osage Indians.

This is a good companion read to The Color of Money: Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap, We Were Eight Years in Power and So You Want to Talk About Race.

JCLKarynH May 09, 2018

Killers of the Flower Moon is a true crime story that is more disturbing and fascinating than any fictional whodunit. David Grann's meticulous research is impressive and anything but dry as he details the who, what, when, where, and why and the layers of corruption, conspiracy, and coverups that became known as The Reign of Terror (the systematic exploitation and murders of several members of the Osage tribe for their million dollar oil headrights). I recommend this book as a great read to start difficult conversations about dehumanization, colonization, crime, and punishment.

m
maipenrai
May 05, 2018

Another example of the murder of Native Americans for greed. J. Edgar Hoover was already up to his tricks in the 1920's. Excellent book about a largely unknown mass murder in Oklahoma. Highly recommend!! Kristi & Abby Tabby

e
elizabeth88_1
Apr 19, 2018

This is one of the best non-fiction books I've read for some time! It saddens me that even in the 20th century, Native Americans were not only still being screwed over, but even murdered by greedy white people who wanted their land! Poor Mollie Burkhart's story got to me , because her own husband was partially responsible for the murder of several members of her family! And he did it all on the orders of a man who claimed to be a Christian!

o
orange_lobster_23
Apr 11, 2018

Journalist David Grann recounts the chilling, forgotten, and buried "Reign of Terror" of the
wealthy Osage nation during the early 1920's and 30's while unearthing additional evidence missing in the original investigation of the nascent F.B.I. The pervasive greed, genocide and cover-up resulted in hundreds of deaths hidden by a conspiracy involving all levels of political hierarchy. A terrifying crime story and shameful part of American history.

g
gopchic
Mar 08, 2018

An intriguing historical recounting of America's FBI and the belittling ways we, as a country, treated American Indians. The under-arching themes could be applied to society today, with alcoholism, drug addiction, philandering, abuse, manipulation, and greed being the vices that still ruin and destroy families, friends, tribes, and society at-large. A great read that taught me history I never knew while invoking a variety of emotions and questions within me.

o
OMalley01
Feb 25, 2018

Enjoyed this book as I have few others. The author's use of primary sources sets an amazing level of credibility to the account of the Osage murders.

When coupled with a chronicle of the FBI's development, the telling of the Osage murders opens the door to a view of US history that is rarely, if ever, explored in our formal education system.

This should be -- or parts of it, at least -- required reading in every American History course in secondary school and college.

Well done!

DBRL_DanaS Feb 05, 2018

A detailed, well-written account of the suspicious murders of many wealthy young Osage Indians during the early 20th century and the investigation that followed. A truly disturbing account of a lesser- known event that speaks to the extent of human greed and exploitation of minority groups in the US. Despite the subject matter, Grann's writing and storycrafting makes this a page turner. Highly recommended for readers interested in true crime, US history, and the frontier west.

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MelissaBee
Jan 31, 2018

MelissaBee thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

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